Orthomosaic Mapping and Photomapping, Part 2

This 40-acre cornfield is a composite of 326 images

This 40-acre cornfield is a composite of 326 photos

Part 1 focused on orthomosaic photogrammetry maps – our high-tech mapping service that delivers image files with embedded position and altitude information for each pixel. Another service that we provide – photomapping – uses a more familiar image processing technique known as photo stitched panorama.

Although the photo collecting technique is similar to orthomosaic mapping, position and altitude information are tossed in favor of the less complicated panorama image processing. We use professional software to align features in the overlap areas, stitch the images together, and shade the transition zones.

Panorama Software is Common, but How Does it Work?

Panorama software works best when the camera is fixed and all images are taken from the same point in space. However, when using a moving camera the altitude must be high and a large overlap used. Therefore, we use the same flight control software and settings for photomapping that we use for orthomosaic mapping.

Our photomaps have the same high resolution as orthomosaic maps, but avoid the expense of the mapping service for generating 3D map sets. If position and altitude information aren’t required, then this is a less expensive way to get ultra-high-resolution maps of large properties.

Map Image Resolution (Geek Alert!)

Our Phantom 4 Professional V2 drone takes images that are 5,742 pixels across and 3,648 pixels high, which yield an image size of 19.98 megabytes (rounded to 20 MB). At an altitude of 400 feet, that image represents a ground view that’s 600 by 400 feet. Dividing pixels by distance yields the spatial resolution, which in this case is 9.6 pixels per foot. (In metric units, that’s 3.2 cm/pixel.)

For example, take an acre of land, which is 43,560 square feet. When photographed at an altitude of 400 feet, one acre takes up 18% of the camera’s image. The area-to-image ratio is scalable, so an orthomosaic map or photomap of 40 acres can be covered with 8 images. The composite image size is then 145 megapixels (MP), with a resolution of 3.2 cm/pixel. The key word here is “composite,” since a large number of photos (e.g. 326 photos at 20 MB each) contribute to this composite image.

Since a map’s image size is proportional to the number of acres, we can estimate your finished map’s image file at 6 MP per acre. This number can grow 20% or more because we’ll always be photographing a larger tract than required. In terms of file size, the finished JPG image file will end up at about 3 MB per acre.

Want to Proceed? Here’s What We Need to Know:

When specifying a mapping job, clients just need to provide their tract boundaries and we’ll take care of the rest. We’ll determine the appropriate parameters, such as 85% overlap frame to frame, 85% overlap track to track, and flying altitude. Overlap is partly determined by the height of objects on the ground (such as trees) and seasonal variations (such as leaves).

Our flight control software will use this information to generate the photo-taking commands to be used by the drone’s autopilot, which ensures the photo-taking process is accurate and repeatable. This is especially useful if the map needs to be updated for project progress or for seasonal variations.

Viewing Large Image Files on Your Computer

For our example above, a 145 MP image is too large to display on common photo viewers such as the MS Office Picture manager. However, it can be viewed with more advanced software such as Adobe’s Photoshop. Of note, we can resize large images so they’re viewable on your photo viewer, but the resolution will have to be decreased.

How Much Will Map Services Cost?

Every job has its own unique requirements, so we don’t publish our prices. However, our prices are very competitive and we deliver an excellent value. We’re happy to take your map requirements and give you an estimate within 24 hours. We guarantee our work will meet or exceed your requirements.

Call or e-mail. We’d love to hear from you!

Orthomosaic Mapping and Photomapping, Part 1

Aerial Drone Photography is the Ideal Technology for Orthomosaic Mapping and Photomapping!

Digital Elevation Model

Digital Elevation Model Topographical Map

Realm of Possibilities

In this article, the term orthomosaic mapping is used to describe the orthomosaic photogrammetry mapping technique, which is a computationally-intense method that yields position and altitude information for each pixel in the map. The term photomapping is used to describe the use of photostitching software to generate large panoramic maps.

Our orthomosaic map deliverables include: ultra-high resolution 2D maps, 3D Digital Elevation Model (DEM) topographical maps, 3D models, and 3D point clouds.

Our Photomap deliverable is a 2D map image similar to Earth-type maps but with ultra-high resolution.

As implied, “high-resolution” means these map image files can be very large – on the order of 3-4 megapixels per acre. For example, an 80-acre map will have around 300 MP and a JPG image file of around 160 MB. Large files for sure, but the terrain detail is amazing!

Who Can Use Orthomosaic Maps?

Surveyors, Architects, and Civil Engineers are several of the many professions that use orthomosaic maps for their land development and construction projects. They have the budget for high-end software, which can further process our orthomosaic map products.

Real Estate marketers and landowners may also need high resolution maps but don’t want to make the significant investment in photogrammetry software. For these users, we offer photomaps, which provide beautiful full-color map images. More on photomapping in Part 2.

Either way, these maps have high enough resolution to detect very small features. For example, a 1 foot by 1 foot object is represented with around 100 pixels. Tract size can range from less than one acre to thousands of acres.

What Makes Aerial Drone Orthomosaic Maps So Special?

Three dimensional computing is at the heart of calculating position and altitude information for each pixel. The numerically-intense software that does this, to my knowledge, hasn’t been made available for personal computers, so most users have to use online mapping services. For more detailed information on how this specialized software works, please refer to this article at ScienceDirect.com.

How Is It Done?

Orthomosaic mapping software requires many photographs of the landscape so each pixel gets multiple look angles. The software then assigns position and altitude information to each pixel. As you might reason, this is a very complicated process. To get good results, very high overlaps of the subject area are required – on the order of 75 to 90%. This requires that each ground point is photographed 16 to 100 times.

Aerial drones with precise GPS-based navigation are ideal for photographing landscape with this kind of precision. Hundreds or even thousands of high-resolution photographs are taken, typically looking straight down, and stored on the drone’s internal memory card. Back at the office, these photos are then uploaded to the mapping service and reconstructed by their orthomosaic software to create stunning, full-color maps, DEM maps, 3D models, and point clouds.

To achieve good results, the drone’s altitude must be around 4-5 times the altitude of the highest object, such as trees. The algorithms work best when there’s low wind and lots of leaves on the trees. Water can be a challenge due to its reflectivity. With less-than-ideal photography, the algorithms have difficulty assigning position and altitude information to the pixels. If done incorrectly, the resulting map either has strangely-shaped areas or areas that are blanked out.

Orthomosaic Map Deliverable Products:

  • 2D Map – full-color image of the landscape, including position and altitude information.
  • Digital Elevation Model – color-coded for elevation, any color scheme is possible as well as contour lines.
  • 3D model – full color three dimensional image. The model can be viewed on-screen from any perspective.
  • Point Cloud – typically viewed with high-end software. It’s a full color 3D model using points.

In part 2, we’ll examine photomapping, which will be of particular interest to real estate marketers and landowners.

Instant Photo and File Delivery, Update

We have improved our method to deliver your photo and video files, so this is an update to our blog “Instant Photo and File Delivery,” posted in March.

We Deliver Your Files via Google Drive

We Deliver Your Files via Google Drive

We Deliver Your Photos and Videos Fast!

Often, our clients are on site so when we finish our aerial drone photography session we copy the files to the client’s computer or deliver them on a USB thumb drive.

When the client is not on site, we deliver their files within two business days using our Google Drive account. The process is easy and no software needs to be installed by the client. We send a link via e-mail and the client simply clicks on the link to arrive at a shared folder where they can view and download their files.

Does Google Drive Work For Smart Phones and Tablets?

We haven’t found a platform yet that doesn’t work with G-Drive! Desktop computers seem to be a little easier to work with for most people, but G-Drive can also be used with smart phones and tablets. Although we haven’t tested all of the devices out there, we have been successful with the latest Android and iOS operating systems.

Android

Click on the link in our e-mail and the G-Drive folder should appear. Select the files and then download. The files will appear in your download folder and can be viewed or copied from there.

iOS

Click on the link in our e-mail and the G-Drive should appear. Select the file to view, then save to your file system. You may have to save your files one at a time.

Note: Earlier versions of iOS may give you access to the device’s local file system. Our iPad 9.7 Pro is running iOS v12, which makes it much more difficult to save files to the device’s local file system. The Apple way is to save your files to “My Drive” which means saving to your account on iCloud, DropBox, Google Drive, etc. If someone finds a better way, then please send me a comment.

What Should I Expect To Pay For Aerial Drone Photography Services?

Let’s Start With Some of the Costs of Running a Business . . .

The Business Part of Aerial Drone Photography

The Business Aspect of Aerial Drone Photography

. . . specifically, our drone photography business. There are many operating costs spread across aerial photography operations. They include: drone hardware, accessories, digital camera, camera glide, desktop computer, laptop, tablet, software, office expenses, Internet access, desk phone, mobile phone, aviation liability insurance, FAA certification, transportation, accounting, banking, taxes, etc. These costs are spread across all of our services.

Is a Drone Shoot that Complicated?

We go through a lot of effort to deliver results so you don’t have to deal with these burdens. A hobbyist can go out and buy a drone for less than $500 and then go into “business.” However, that is where the similarity ends. A professional drone operation is so much more than that, so let me explain some of the preparations that go into every drone photography session:

  1. The first step is receiving the task from our client. Through phone conversations and e-mail, we learn about the location and type of photography services desired. (Photography in this article includes videography.)
  2. From there, we look up the location on Google Maps; then check against the FAA’s restricted flight zones. We can fly in certain areas, but others are off limits for drones. Please read our blog.
  3. We then hand-chart the flight requirements onto a hard copy from Google Maps. Tools include self-developed programs to calculate altitudes, speeds, camera tilt angles, fields of view, etc. We know how to translate the client’s requirements into drone commands and can visualize what the camera’s field of view will look like. We’re good at this, very good. Usually, we get our shots on the first try!
  4. Flight requirements are then entered into drone flight programs. We use several, and select the appropriate program for the mission. Some examples: videography, surveying, mapping, etc. Programmed drone flights provide smooth, repeatable missions. This is particularly useful if the client wants us to fly the same mission again, such as for progress reports or seasonal changes.
  5. Driving time to the client’s site is one of our major cost drivers. We need to charge for extra driving time outside our service area.
  6. On site, we look over the terrain for obstacles that may pose a hazard to our drone, such as trees, power lines, light poles, water towers, etc.
  7. The fun part, flying the drone, goes relatively quickly. The preparation steps above help to ensure a successful mission; while collecting the required photography takes less than 20 minutes.
  8. If the client is on site, we download the photography to their computer or give them their files on a USB thumb drive. Otherwise, we upload their files within 24 hours to a cloud service and send them a link. We operate a fee-for-service business, and deliver unlimited copyright with our products.
  9. Returning to the office, we download the files to a desktop computer and back them up onto a storage server. Periodically, we back up client files to BluRay disks and retain them for several years.
  10. Of course, collecting our fees, processing credit cards, accounting, paying taxes, sending receipts, logging flights, etc., all add to the time commitment.

Just a Quick Note on Postprocessing

If the client has asked for postprocessing services, we have a number of high-end desktop programs for photography, videography, and mapping. We’re experts with this software, taking the uncertainty out of the equation and delivering products that meet or exceed the client’s expectations. Examples of our postprocessing products can be found on our Portfolio page.

So, Just How Much Time Do You Spend on a Standard Drone Shoot?

Six hours, which typically breaks down into thirds: (1) Client communications; (2) Mission planning; and (3) Executing the mission. Compared to most other skilled trades, our prices are very reasonable. In the end, we’re in business to earn money, but it just comes down to the fact that we love to fly!

Zoom-in With a Fixed Lens Camera

Zooming In With Your Drone's Fixed Camera Lens

Zoom-in With Your Drone’s Fixed Camera Lens

At one time or another, everyone has had situations where zooming in on a video clip adds that finishing touch. Whether it’s for effect or for greater stand-off distance, the convenience of camera zoom takes your photography to the professional level.

In this blog, I’ll show you how to get Full High Definition (1080p) results at a zoom factor of 1.4x using a fixed-lens camera. This is good information for venues like sporting events and weddings, which can be recorded from the air but at a great enough distance so the drone’s presence has minimal notice. For more information on camera resolution please read my blog Setting Up Your Aerial Drone Camera.

Do I Need an Expensive High-End Drone and Camera?

Although that would be one way to get zoom capability, it can be a very expensive investment. But, let’s look at just one of many high-end drone/camera solutions:

For a modest investment of $5,000 you can purchase a DJI Inspire 2 drone, Zenmuse X5S camera, and Lumix 14-42mm zoom lens and the results will be quite professional. The Lumix lens gives you the standard camera focal length equivalent of 28-84mm. So, with 50mm as the standard for zero magnification, this camera has a zoom range of 0.6x wide angle to 1.7x telephoto. Remember these numbers.

Is There a Less Expensive Alternative?

There’s another solution that is far less expensive and provides excellent results. Many drones on the market can record Cinema 4K video, which has a resolution of 4096×2160 pixels. However, most users are satisfied with a Full HD resolution of 1920×1080 pixels.

What these numbers mean is that to get a digital zoom capability, you can record video in Cinema 4K mode, which leaves plenty of resolution to render any portion of the frame in Full HD. Rendering the video is done in post-processing, where video clips are transformed into the finished video.

For example, we can use our drone to record the desired scene in C4K mode. We start with the equivalent wide angle focal length of the camera’s lens, which is 35mm (0.7x). Using post-processing software, as much or as little of the C4K image can be cropped for the desired magnification. So, when your video is captured in C4K, you can select a crop “window” of up to 50% and render your new “zoomed-in” video in beautiful FHD. In other words, you get a full-definition 1920×1080 pixels! For this level of cropping, you achieve a zoom factor of 1.4x, equivalent to a 70mm telephoto lens.

Compared with the $5,000 solution, which zooms 0.6x to 1.7x, this digital zoom technique gets you 0.7x to 1.4x.

Any More Slick Ideas?

Two for sure . . .

  1. If you want even more zoom, just crop to get the desired magnification. There’s no limit to how much you can crop, though you will start to see the results of lower resolution. For example, you can crop at 25%, which gives you a zoom factor of 2.8x (140mm telephoto) but the resulting FHD video will display a lower resolution of 1024×540 pixels.
  2. Any method of zoom will increase the image’s sensitivity to camera movement. So a small and acceptable level of vibration at 0.7x may be objectionable at 1.4x. Unwanted vibration can be minimized in post-processing using image stabilization. For more information please read my blog Video Production and Post-Processing.

At FAD-Photo, we use the DJI Phantom 4 Professional V2, which provides a highly stable platform capable of stunning high definition photographs and videos. We have mastered the art of taking C4K videos and using our post-processing software to minimize vibration and render FHD videos.

We deliver the results you would expect from a professional aerial drone photography service! For more information, please refer to our Aerial Drone Photography and Video Services page.

Flying in High Winds – What Could Possibly Go Wrong?

Propeller Spin-off

Wind Gusts Caused This Problem

In this blog, we explain why we limit our flights to wind speeds of 10 mph or less. Seem drastic? Please read on; this is good information.

Drone electronics are quite sophisticated, as they use inertial navigation to stabilize the drone’s camera so it’s almost free from the effects of wind patterns. However, there’s a design limit at which the stabilization reaches the “stops” and no longer holds the camera level.

When the drone is buffeted by gusty winds, the magnitude and direction of the wind can shift quite suddenly. This gives the drone’s stabilization system a workout and sometimes the requirements go beyond the linear operating range. The result is a momentary tilting of the image sent to your remote control. Even with non-gusty winds, the drone’s camera may yaw left or right as the drone’s control system compensates for the wind.

OK, Crooked Photos And Videos; Is That It?

Not really – something much worse can happen when the drone is buffeted by strong gusts: Such as the sudden loss of your drone! The drone’s stabilization system works very hard to keep the camera steady, but when the wind vector tries to tilt the drone, the motors will adjust speed AND DIRECTION, as necessary, to maintain level. If the wind vector is strong enough, one or more motors can momentarily be driven in reverse.

If your propellers screw on, such as the Phantom 3 series, they rotate in a direction that is usually self-tightening. However, if the motor momentarily reverses in a gusty situation then the propeller can actually unscrew and spin-off. The best way to safeguard against a spin-off is to screw the propellers on very tightly. If you’re flying a DJI drone, this means using the supplied wrench.

If your drone uses the new quick release propellers, they can still spin-off, but you’re at a lower risk. Take the Phantom 4, Inspire 2, and Mavic series for example. Their propellers mount with a push and 1/8 of a turn. You (we all) feel safe because there’s a relatively strong spring to hold the propeller in place. However, these drones’ control systems can still drive the motors in reverse. When thrust is reversed and the propeller pushes hard enough against the spring then it will fly-off.

Having some speed on the drone reduces the forces that can drive the motors in reverse. But the pilot should be very careful about low speeds and hovering because these are the conditions that make it more likely that a gust will try to pitch the drone over.

Of course, the best way to safeguard against a spin-off is to avoid flying in high winds. The graphic above was taken from telemetry received from an actual spin-off event.

Why Can’t The Drone Fly With One Propeller Missing?

If a propeller spins off your aerial drone this is what you can expect:

A drone with six or more propellers can survive a one-propeller spin-off. But drones with four propellers are doomed. These drones have two props that rotate clockwise and two that rotate counterclockwise. They were designed this way to cancel the drone’s tendency to rotate. But if you remove one propeller, the drone will go into a spin.

Without a propeller there’s no lift so that corner drops down. So in addition to spin, the drone goes into an uncontrolled roll/pitch. The drone is hopelessly out of control and falls to the earth.

Recommendations

Inspect the propellers before every flight. If you must fly in winds greater than 10 mph, understand that gusts can easily double the wind speed. Take precautions that the propellers are screwed on tightly with a wrench. If you see the image tilting on your remote control, land your drone immediately. Better to fly another day than to take chances on a windy day.

Visual Observers For Your Aerial Drone Operations

 

Ear Buds Provide Hands-Free Communications With Your Visual Observer

Ear Buds Provide Hands-Free Communications With Your Visual Observer

The FAA does not require an Aerial Drone Visual Observer (VO) for Small UAS operations. However, the optional VO is an important member of your team as he/she can help maintain situation awareness. For example, things can get dicey real fast when a low flyer, such as a helicopter, suddenly appears. This is especially true when operating near airports, private fields, hospitals, etc.

The VO helps the pilot assess the drone’s position, attitude, altitude, and direction. The VO also observes the air space for other air traffic or hazards.

Prior to getting airborne, the VO should be briefed on the flight plan and maintain communications with the pilot. The VO is not required to have any kind of certification and cannot operate the drone. If there’s more than one drone operation going on at the same time, the VO must be dedicated to one drone only.

I’m a Drone Pilot, so how can a Visual Observer be Useful to Me?

The FAA states in Part 107.33 that . . . “the visual observer (if one is used), and the person manipulating the flight control of the small unmanned aircraft system must be able to see the unmanned aircraft throughout the entire flight . . .” The FAA goes on to state that either the VO or (emphasis mine) the person manipulating the flight control satisfies this requirement.

Many of my commercial drone flights go behind buildings and landscape features such as trees. So, I often engage the client as a VO or my wife, who accompanies me on many of my flights. For some of my more complicated flight plans, we use earbuds with our cell phones so we can position ourselves to maintain visual contact with the drone and voice contact with each other.

Can I use Binoculars to Keep Track of my Drone?

The FAA states that vision must be unaided by any device other than corrective lenses. Since small drones tend to be real hard to spot when their distance from the operator exceeds several hundred feet, a strobe light can greatly extend your line of sight. For example, Firehouse Technology offers compact, self-contained strobes that weigh less than 8 grams. You’ll want to ensure it doesn’t impact your drone’s airworthiness.

Can I use the Drone’s Camera View to Maintain Visual Contact?

Aerial drones can operate at great distances from the operator and download a camera view in real time. However, the FAA requires that the pilot/VO must maintain visual line of sight to the drone. This question was more explicitly addressed in development (pre-Part 107) documents.

Want More Information?

Please refer to the FAA’s requirements for Visual Observers found in Part 107.33 of Title 14 CFR.

Video Production Sound Track

Recording Your Voice Using A Cell Phone

Recording Your Voice Using A Cell Phone

I mentioned in last year’s blog on post-production processing that the sound track can be tricky. Especially when the client wants music that they’ve heard from other media sources (such as the radio, TV, concert, CD, etc.) These sources are almost always copyrighted and the owners can (and probably will) track down violators and demand compensation.

Beware, The Music Industry Has Their Ways!

Last year, I know someone who came up with a slick idea to digitize a 1960’s record album and used about 30 seconds of it on a YouTube video. YouTube recognized the song, identified the copyright holder, and gave them a warning! So, you can’t be too careful about copyright violation.

How Much Will It Cost For A Music Track?

The cost for a music track depends on the service. For example, TripleScoop licenses 3-5 minute music tracks for $60 to professional photographers (this is my class). However, for small businesses, such as real estate listings, their licenses run $120. Large businesses will cost even more.

I once had a client ask for a specific song and I had to track down the copyright owner. It happened to be a big Hollywood outfit, Universal Music Publishing Group. They quoted $1500 per month to play this track in a small business marketing video! Needless to say, this expense was not in the client’s budget.

In addition to the cost for acquiring a commercial music license, there’s also the time required for the post-production part of it. This can be significant and includes searching for suitable music, getting a quote for the license, getting the client’s approval, purchasing the license, and coordinating the audio track with the video. Sometimes, several iterations are required until the client approves the finished video.

Are there penalties if you get caught by the copyright owner? Yes, and they’re covered by U.S. federal law under Title 17 US Code Section 106. Damages can include fines and court expenses.

The Path of Least Resistance Often Works Best

The challenges above are among the reasons that a client’s voice track works so well. First, the client owns the copyright on their own voice recording. Also, it personalizes the video to their prospective clients.

How to Record Your Own Voice Track

Clients often take my draft video and practice their narrative with it. Then record their voice using a cell phone (e.g. using Voice Recorder/Voice Memo) and send me the .M4A (MPEG-4 Audio file). Such a choreographed voice track works well for my post-production work. When appropriate, I can add a 15 to30 second stock music snippet to the introduction and end.

You will find examples of sound tracks in the videos posted to my portfolio page.

Flying Aerial Drones At Night Is NOT Permitted By The FAA

Flying Your Aerial Drone At Night Is Not Permitted (Without Waiver) By The FAA

Flying Your Aerial Drone At Night Is Not Permitted (Without Waiver) By The FAA

Your drone lights up like a Christmas tree at night, but does that mean you can legally fly your aerial drone at night? Some drone pilots think yes, but I haven’t found justification for night flying in the USA without an FAA waiver.

This is another of my blogs where the FAA’s rules are straightforward. You can avoid a lot of boring reading if you will just take my word to fly your aerial drone in daylight conditions unless you receive a waiver from the FAA.

Let’s find out what the FAA has to say about night flying:

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) rules are found in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) which are federal laws. Those that apply to this topic include:

Title 14 CFR 107.29  Small UAS Daylight Operation.

(a) No person may operate a small unmanned aircraft system during night.

(b) No person may operate a small unmanned aircraft system during periods of civil twilight unless the small unmanned aircraft has lighted anti-collision lighting visible for at least 3 statute miles . . .

(1) Except for Alaska, a period of time that begins 30 minutes before official sunrise and ends at official sunrise.

(2) Except for Alaska, a period of time that begins at official sunset and ends 30 minutes after official sunset.

Reading this excerpt from the rules, the FAA is clear that Aerial Drones shall not be flown at night. However, flying during periods of civil twilight is permitted as long as collision-avoidance lighting requirements are met. Of note, the LED lights on your DJI drone are nowhere near the intensity to qualify for twilight flying; see line (b) above.

The FAA may issue a WAIVER for night flying

Pilots who wish to fly at night may request a certificate of waiver from the FAA’s Administrator. The waiver request must contain a complete description of the proposed operation and justification that establishes that the operation can safely be conducted under the terms of a certificate of waiver.

14 CFR 107.200  Waiver Policy and Requirements:

(a) The Administrator may issue a certificate of waiver authorizing a deviation from any regulation specified in §107.205 if the Administrator finds that a proposed small UAS operation can safely be conducted under the terms of that certificate of waiver.

Of note 14 CFR 107.205 specifically includes flying at night. Your waiver application is submitted to the office of the FAA’s Administrator in Washington, DC.

Can I Fly at Night Under the Model Aircraft Rules of Part 101?

There are some remote pilots that have stated the requirements for 14 CFR 101.41 will allow them to operate at night. In my view, this is a stretch of interpretation for most pilots.

The chapter that covers UAS’s, Part 107, specifically excludes aircraft that are qualified to fly under Part 101. In other words, you can’t use Part 101 rules to justify flying Part 107 aircraft.

Why? Part 101 addresses Moored Balloons, Kites, Amateur Rockets, Unmanned Free Balloons, and Certain Model Aircraft (emphasis mine).  Subparagraph 101.41 addresses the Special Rule for Model Aircraft, which some pilots have stated online justify flying their aerial drones at night.

First, there are several requirements that must be met if your aerial drone is to be considered a model aircraft:

  • You may fly for hobby or recreation ONLY
  • You must register your model aircraft
  • You must fly within visual line-of-sight
  • You must follow community-based safety guidelines and fly within the programming of a nationwide community-based organization

That’s it. Night flying is not explicitly permitted in the subpart for “Certain Model Aircraft”.

Remote Pilots that are flying commercial off-the-shelf aerial drones, such as those manufactured by DJI, will have a hard time convincing the FAA that you qualify under Part 101 rules.  Even if your drone was to qualify under Part 101, the relevant subparts that allow night flying don’t apply to model aircraft. They apply to other aircraft categories, for example:

14 CFR 101.17

No person may operate a moored balloon or kite, between sunset and sunrise unless the balloon or kite, and its mooring lines, are lighted so as to give a visual warning equal to that required for obstructions to air navigation in the FAA publication “Obstruction Marking and Lighting”.

14 CFR 101.25

When operating Class 2-High Power Rockets or Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets, you must comply with the General Operating Limitations of §101.23. In addition, you must not operate Class 2-High Power Rockets or Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets . . .

(d) Between sunset and sunrise without prior authorization from the FAA . . .

14 CFR 101.35

No person may operate an unmanned free balloon unless . . .

(b) No person may operate an unmanned free balloon below 60,000 feet standard pressure altitude between sunset and sunrise . . .

None of these sections (17, 25, and 35) should be used to justify flying aerial drones at night.

Conclusion

The FAA is very clear in Part 107 that flying aerial drones at night is not permitted unless the pilot has received a waiver. Using Part 101 is not a good interpretation of the meaning and intent of the FAA’s rules. However, there are those venues where flying at night is permitted and waiverable. Some that come to mind include certain sporting events, law enforcement, and fire and rescue.

Another resource that I’ve cited before is Drone Law Attorney “Rupprecht Law.”

Please read their legal opinion on How to Fly Your Drone at Night.

Instant Photo and Video File Delivery

FAD-Photo Delivers Your Photo and Video Files via Dropbox for Super Fast Service

We Use Dropbox for Instant File Delivery

FAD-Photo uses Dropbox.com for instant photo and video file delivery. We upload your files to our account and send you a link so all you have to do is click on the link and then click the download button.

In some cases, you may have to wait up to 10 seconds for the download button to appear. When it does, then click to download the file to your computer or smart device.

When two or more files are delivered, we use 9Zip, a generic Windows 10 application. It combines your files into one “Zip” file and then we upload it to Dropbox. The Zip file you download will display like a folder in most operating systems. For example, with Windows 10 you can open, play, and copy your photo and video files to wherever you need them.

Do I Need to Install any Software for Dropbox or 9Zip?

No worries, you won’t need to install any software or set up your own account.

What is a Zip File?

Zip files make more efficient use of your computer’s storage space by reducing the file size and combining multiple files into one file. It works well and the process is lossless – that is, there’s no decrease in your photo’s or video’s quality. The good news is that you won’t have to install any software on your computer, tablet, or smart phone.

Once downloaded, your operating system will treat the zip file very similarly to a folder. Simply click on the zip file just like you would a folder. Your files can then be extracted (just right click) or individually copied to any location you desire. If you’re using Windows 10, you can view/play your files by clicking on them in the zip file. Many other operating systems work similarly.

What About My Tablet or Smart Phone?

Smart devices, such as Android, treat the Zip file a little differently. Use your file explorer to find the zip file, typically in the Download folder. Then select each file (or all) and extract them. Your files will be found in the Download folder and can be opened, played, and copied to wherever you need them. Apple devices running iOS use a similar process.